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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Griego: Nate Cardozo from the electronic frontier foundation join us. Matier: Is the NSA reading our messages right now? Cardozo: yes, absolutely. It’s not like there’s a person sitting there reading it but hey are scanning every email as you type it. Matier: as you type it they are scanning it? Cardozo: as soon as you send it, it goes through a splitter. There's a fiber optic splitter down at the Folsom street facility here in san Francisco. One copy goes to whoever you're sending it to the other copy goes to the NSA. Matier: you're kidding. Every email sent all around?
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Cardozo: since about 2002, yes. Matier: how do they have possibly the capacity to store all that stuff and even if they get it how do they figure out what to look at? Cardozo: they have the most powerful computers in the world. They are building the biggest data center in the world in Utah. This thing is going to store something on the nature of 12 exobites. If you’ve ever even heard of that, that quantity of storage. Absolutely incredible amount of computers. Matier: Now your group was one of the groups that was involved in this legal action that led to the release this week of the judges order concerning NSA. What did he (say in effect?)
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Cardozo: the judge said that the NSA has been lying to the only court, and this is a court that meets in secret, the NSA has been lying to that court for years and years and the court said it needed to stop. This opinion was from 2011 and we just got it two days ago. Matier: so this brings up a question to me. I don't know what you guys think, do we have any privacy at all when you go on the internet?
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Cardozo: from our perspective at the Electronic Frontier Foundation yes, absolutely, the Fourth Amendment says you have a right to be secure in your papers and effects. That includes your emails. Matier: but your email isn't the U.S. mail. It's owned by Google or it's owned by Facebook. It's owned by Yahoo. Do those people have -- is it up to them who they decide to turn it over to the government or a company or somebody that that's looking at it wants to look at it? Cardozo: it's not. Federal law says that they have to keep that email private unless the government comes with a warrant. The NSA has not gotten warrants to read your email and yet they are getting copies anyway. Matier: isn't that amazing? Anchors: yeah.
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Mallicoat: Is there some sort of computer that just looks for keywords and if they find something there they don't like it spits it out and then they read the email? They can't read them all. Cardozo: so it's our understanding that yes, there is a computer looking for the keywords. However, if it finds the keywords and an actual person reads it, if it doesn't, they are storing it any way for up to five years, and the NSA has this interesting term they use the word “collect”. They don't “collect” an email
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Cardozo continued: until they read it. Even if they are storing it, that's not “collection”. Matier: so, in other words, they say, whatever the case, watch what you put on the keyboard, frank. you are going right down to Folsom street one copy goes to summit and the other one to uncle sam. Boy, uncle spam. Thanks
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney for Electronic Frontier Foundation
ALJAZAM 09/11/2013
Well the disclosure is important most because now we know that the first NSA violated its on rules. Second lied about it to the court. Third, was rebuked strongly by the court, and even more than that, the court itself, this is a secret court that meets in Washington, D.C., the court said that it had no way of knowing whether the NSA was complying, and the NSA had lost the court's confidence. Those are pretty startling revelations.
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney for Electronic Frontier Foundation
ALJAZAM 09/11/2013
(what) it turns out they were doing, this is for years, by the way, they were conducting fishing expeditions, without suspision, to look into your phone calls. to look into tens of thousands of Americans' phone calls to gather suspicion, that they would then use to look into your phone calls. If that sounds circular, it is because it is.
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney for Electronic Frontier Foundation
ALJAZAM 09/11/2013
My organization, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, as well as organizations like the ACLU and the Center for Constitutional Rights are suing to stop that bulk collection. Representatives Sensenbrenner who is the original author of the Patriot Act, has joined our lawsuit and said, as a friend of the court, and said this was not the intent of the Patriot Act. so yes,
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney for Electronic Frontier Foundation
ALJAZAM 09/11/2013
Well, it seems like the NSA is getting support from industry, from companies within the United States, this would be people like Verizon and AT&T. The NSA is also sharing its data. We know that it shares data with the CIA, with the FBI, with the Drug Enforcement Agency, with the IRS and today we learned that they share unfiltered raw data with Israel. This is data that they aren't even allowed to share with the CIA in unfiltered form. Apparently they are sharing it with Israelis.
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